O’Sulloc Green Tea Milk Spread

_MG_0094-2

While traveling in Seoul, one of the places I wanted to visit was O’Sulloc (오설록), a café that specializes in all things tea, particularly Jeju Island green tea. If you ever plan to travel to South Korea, I definitely recommend going to an O’Sulloc branch and trying out their green tea latte. Utterly divine.

_MG_0098
Look at that hot serif in all caps… just kidding. But that logo…

Anyway, while I was shopping around Insa-dong (인사동), I came across an O’Sulloc branch. I wandered inside, and a small glass jar filled with some green substance caught the corner of my eye. I walked over, grabbed the jar, and read the serif font that splayed across the label: Green Tea Milk Spread. Wait, did my eyes deceive me? Green Tea? Milk? WHAT?! Would it taste like matcha milk tea?

_MG_0102
Don’t let the green gross you out

I contemplated for several days before saying “F it, YOLO,” and bought the 8000won jar. When I came home, I was so excited to try it. I immediately broke the seal, and an intense green tea aroma greeted my nostrils and made my mouth water. The spread is thick and smooth. I greedily sampled it, and my smile disappeared. It was like eating frosting. I enjoyed the subtle taste of green tea, but that was all it offered. There was no explosion of green tea flavor. The sweetness, probably from the amount of sugar added, overpowered the bitterness of green tea.

Don’t get me wrong, I think it makes whole wheat bread—utterly dry and bland—taste great. Add slices of banana on top of the spread, and you got yourself breakfast. Though, for me, I can only handle eating it once a week. Hopefully I can figure out what to do to find the perfect balance of sweetness. If you have any suggestions, let me know!

If you love sweet things and green tea flavored goodies, then maybe O’Sulloc Green Tea Milk Spread should be your go-to spread on bread 🙂

_MG_0097

Advertisements

udon

One of my friends loves saying “#udou,” which I often read it as “udon,” hence the title of this post. For those who don’t know, “you do you” is “the act of doing the things that you normally do. Nothing more, nothing less. Just being yourself and showing everyone who’s boss around here” (source: urbandictionary).

The other day I was out with some friends who are my juniors (i.e. they’re still in high school or college). I haven’t seen some of them in a while, so we jump right into pleasantries like “how are you” or “what’s been going on in your life.” Then this conversation proceeded…

Friend A: Did you graduate yet, Marisa?
Me: Yeah, I did.
Friend A: Finally… took you long enough

What. Did my ears hear correctly? Now, text is pretty hard to convey mockery, but it sounded like I was being judged for taking six years to graduate. I let it slide but it did remind me of times when an acquaintance often joked that I was never going to graduate.

Yes, it took me six years, but I proudly wear that fact like a medal because it could have been longer due to budget cuts. I am fortunate enough to even have studied in higher education, something my mom didn’t have the opportunity to do. So what if it did take me an extra two years than the norm? I am doing things my way, just like you’re doing things your way. Everyone’s moving along at their own pace. Is that so wrong?

I hope I don’t sound passive aggressive because that isn’t the intent. I think as long as you have a goal in mind and you’re enjoying the journey towards that goal, then it’s okay to move through life at the pace you want to go.

#udou

Indian Garden

My friends and I ventured out to Indian Garden in Pleasanton. The restaurant was very quaint, and the staff was very attentive.

20160313_130600-2
Paneer Tikka Masala ($12.99) and Plain Naan ($1.99)

I ordered Paneer Tikka Masala and Plain Naan. I asked for medium spiciness, which to my surprise, wasn’t too spicy. I take it as a sign my mouth can finally handle spicy food! Success!

Anyway, the Paneer Tikka Masala is rich in flavor and the spices did not assault my palate. I liked the paneer’s texture because it was firm like a fried tofu. I’ve had some experiences with crumbly paneer, and I wasn’t too fond of that texture. The naan is incredibly moist and it complemented the sauce. I think there was some oil drizzled on it to add flavor, but I’m not sure what kind of oil they used. I was tempted to order another batch to-go and munch on it without anything.

I want to go back and try a different spiciness level and samosas. I definitely recommend going if you ever in the area and craving some Indian food.